School of Architecture, Graduate Center for Planning and the Environment

Students: Erica Asinas, Haley Balcanoff, Zeid Bushnaq, Mariah Chinchila, Shelby Fredrickson, Aishwarya Kulkarni, Yanxin Mao, Duane Martinez, Saloni Mehta, Kaila Wilson, Anna Yie
Faculty: Tom Jost, Gita Nandan

Our vision for Edgemere in 2100 is one of social equity, ecological integrity, regenerative systems, and collective ownership. People leave by choice, relocate to higher ground, or adapt to a new way of living with water; all have a choice in a just and equitable transition. Those who remain become stewards of a place returning to nature, through revitalized marshes and environmental restoration. Advancements in agriculture and aquaculture become the focal points of a circular local economy, creating wealth and increasing social mobility.

 

The world will look very different in 2100. How we move, produce food, mitigate waste, travel, and interact with the environment must change. The constant in this future of innovation is the integral human fabric of communities like Edgemere that will remain strong and keep rising.

 

Local opportunities for future agriculture and aquaculture-based economies ensure sustainable and resilient development through local farming, eco-recreation, food distribution satellite, and a community credit union.

 

Local opportunities for future agriculture and aquaculture-based economies ensure sustainable and resilient development through local farming, eco-recreation, food distribution satellite, and a community credit union.

 

The Edge is the result of a community planning strategy to anchor Edgemere through an adaptable, people-centered urban core, the foundation of a self-sustaining aquavillage by 2100.

 

Edgemere is on the frontlines. It is time for a generation of advocacy and planning to unify a community and prepare to Let the Water In.

Link to presentation file